Wednesday, February 07, 2007

It was hot in the greenhouse, especially in wool!



Poet Tom Devaney gives a toast.
salad....


Tom Devaney toasting the 100-Mile Suit and the Sweet Green Hangout:

In my salad days, I ate salads.

I am not going to explain this, I worked at a framer’s market at Prospect Park in Brooklyn and literally ate salads all of the time.

But what does the phrase “Salad Days” mean, I’ve never been completely sure: it’s a time when you are young and green, OK; but salad days are not only someone’s youthful hey-day, but also a time of passion. And in that, and this beautiful light here today, I’d also like to believe that all times of passion are our salad days.


One of the great and fatiguing failures of our time is a kind of an inevitable-feeling, daily, and routine failure of the imagination. Aaron’s Sweet Green Hangout and Kelly’s 100-mile suit embraces the imagination, which is why we are also here--to embrace and to toast Aaron and Kelly, and the dozens of people who worked on all of the parts of these two remarkable projects.

So--

To the builder of a sweet green shelter that shows us how to use our minds and our hearts in order to survive and to live more gracefully in the process.

To a really intrepid fabric artist, who, has gone headlong into 100 mile radius--and a 100 miles from there--and a 100 more from there--to find everything she could find--from everyone she could find--to bring together all of the pieces of this glorious 100-mile suit (and us) together.

To the ICA curatorial staff (Elyse, Jenelle, Naomi, Jill), who, brought all of the pieces together in hundreds of other ways, amidst the welter of the Locally Localized Gravity show.

To Aaron Igler and Kelly Cobb, friends and beautiful peers, who show us that DIY: do it yourself is in fact a group project, we raise our glasses, and wish you well. Aaron may you always dance in your 100-mile suit like there's nobody watching. And Kelly may you join him--and may we all join you both. To Aaron and Kelly--we salute you!

By TD (http://thomasdevaney.blogspot.com/)


T.D. eats salad:
the printed shirt circle:
Ruby Sue:
Dexter has a reflective moment:


Ann Burton:shirt designer and stitcher sewing on buttons!


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Please come to our low key reveal/presentation and celebration!

PICS OF MARTHA ON THE UNDERS:







Between a sock and a hard place.

Good news! The socks are finished and look great. Bad news: They are in transit to us and will not reach us by presentation day. 21 collaborators have worked so hard on top of busy lives to make this suit happen. Life takes over in some instances. We have collectively put in 506+ Volunteer hours and hit a few bumps in the road: sock heels, underwear girth, time to weave, an ice storm, veg tan, combed wool, missing fleece, the flu. Success despite (and because of) the bumps! Aaron be dressed in fine philly fashion tomorrow. See you at the ICA bring your salad.





Melanie Lester is designing the slacks and stitching them up!






Deer Skin Loafer by Marie Wigglesworth (brain-tanned deer by Drew Twele)







Here is a list with the manufactures name and as much of an address as I could get. Hope this works for you. See you Sunday. Marie

Brain tanned deer skin - Andrew Twele
Maryland

Vegetable tan(heel/toe cap)- Wickett and Craig
120 Cooper Road
Curwensville, Pennsylvania

Barge cement- Barge
710 Ohio Street
Buffalo, New York

Thread/laces- Blue Mountain Industries
Blue Mountain, Alabama 36201

Rit dye(yellow)- Stamford, Connecticut

Cushion cork- Anorim Manufacture
Trever, Wisconsin

Insoling- Texon
Russell, Massachusetts

Vibram shoe sole- Quabaug
Brookline, Massachusetts

Shoe maker- Marie Wigglesworth
Hatboro, Pennsylvania


Aimee Dolby of Betsy Ross Patterns: Studio view (felted Vest)





Mary Smull, Designer and Weaver of Fabric:



Thunder's wool, shown here spun (Marleen Halstead) Is being used for the slacks.

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I,myself spent today felting yardage for the vest. To even out the heavy labor in the arm region Suzie Brandt suggested we go out to the roller rink. Had I planned I could have roller skated and felted simultaneously. Two birds as it were....

We stopped by Suzie's to see the tie-in-progress, wow! She is planning to send the rest of the walnut dyed wool to Kristine for sock-tie coordination.

Kristine Woods rocks the socks...with wool spun by Mac!





Shoes by Wigglesworth!
Marie is making the shoes out of Deer skin that Andrew Twele's deer skin!
see pics:













what is a suit without a tie?
Suzie Brandt is working on the tie....hubba hubba! She gathered some black walnut husks and dyed the wool, black walnut is substanitive so you don't need a mordant--local, i think she gathered from the park across the street. Caroline Maw-Deis spun the wool.





Mary is weaving away! Socks/tie/undies-working
Slacks/Shirt and Vest-concept art/mock up
Ahoes are in the works!
felted wool yardage-this is my job this week.
please send spare elbow grease.













seeing yellow!

Roughly 8 percent of the essential suit materials (thread, shoe soles, the combing process for some of the wool) is outside of our margin of 100-miles and will need to be dyed yellow-yellow being a signifier of being "outside the margins"

I am just now coordinating yellow things-tan soles, yellow warp thread and shoemakers thread. I am ikat dyeing the sock and tie skeins with weld-an electric yellow. This will give a spotty yellow effect on the finished garment.

update:
The tie weaver (Suzie) and sock knitter (Kristine) have spun goods (Nichole W. and Caroline) in hand!Spinners (Toni and Judi) are spinning away at the shirt fabric (Melanie)The weaver (Mary) is dressing her loom with slacks (Annie B.) spun goods from (Marlene) on the way!
The shoemaker(Marie) has brain-tanned leather (Drew) in hand! I (KC) am felting for a fleece vest (Aimee) and dyeing things, tinging them Yellow. Michelle is cutting bone buttons. (Megan) is helping us with a grant proposal for artist/crafter honorarium funding!

I am amazed at the outpouring of effort and support from all of the artists/crafters. All working individually or satellite groups at our crafts, aware of the larger community but not really connected to it. It is a real fiber family reunion when all of these folks get together--the fiber is a flyin'!